×

Russian punks vs. Putin

A Moscow judge sentenced three members of the provocative punk band Pussy Riot to two years in prison on hooliganism charges on Friday following a trial seen around the world as an emblem of Russia's intolerance of dissent.

1 of 8

Michelle Siu, The Canadian Press/AP Photo |

A supporter of the Russian punk band Pussy Riot yells during a protest outside the Russian consulate in Toronto on Friday, Aug. 17, 2012.

2 of 8

Yevgeny Feldman, Novaya Gazeta/AP Photo |

Pussy Riot punk group supporters place masks on a monument to WWII heroes to resemble Pussy Riot members, at an underground station in Moscow on Friday, Aug. 17, 2012. Three group members who were jailed in March following a guerrilla performance denouncing President Vladimir Putin in Moscow's main cathedral have unwillingly emerged as vivid — and very different — characters.

3 of 8

Ariel Schalit/AP Photo |

A protester holds a placard at a protest in support of the Russian punk group Pussy Riot, whose members face prison for a stunt against President Vladimir Putin, outside Russia's embassy in Tel Aviv, Israel, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012.

4 of 8

Misha Japaridze/AP Photo |

A policeman tries to detain a masked supporter of the Russian punk group Pussy Riot inside the Turkish embassy near the court in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012.

5 of 8

Mary Altaffer/AP Photo |

Protesters are arrested during a demonstration in front of the Russian consulate in support of Russian punk band Pussy Riot, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012 in New York. A Russian judge found three members of the provocative punk band guilty of hooliganism on Friday, in one of the most closely watched cases in recent Russian history. The judge said the three band members committed hooliganism driven by religious hatred and offending religious believers. The three were arrested in March after a guerrilla performance in Moscow's main cathedral calling for the Virgin Mary to protect Russia against Vladimir Putin, who was elected to a new term as Russia's president a few days later.

6 of 8

Michelle Siu,The Canadian Press/AP Photo |

A supporter of the Russian female punk band "Pussy Riot" sports a mask during a protest outside the Russian consulate in Toronto on Friday, Aug. 17, 2012.

7 of 8

Misha Japaridze/AP Photo |

Feminist Russian punk group Pussy Riot members, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, center, Maria Alekhina, right, and Yekaterina Samutsevich, are escorted to a glass cage at a court room in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012.

8 of 8

Misha Japaridze/AP Photo |

Feminist punk group Pussy Riot members, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, right, Maria Alekhina, center, and Yekaterina Samutsevich, sit in a glass cage at a court room in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012.

8 of 8