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World remembers 'Forgotten War' 60 years later

Sixty years ago Saturday was the day a silent, brusque signing of an armistice treaty ended a bloody stalemate in Korea after 37 months.

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Wong Maye-E/ AP Photo |

North Korean war veterans of the Korean War watch fireworks during the "Arirang" mass games song-and-dance ensemble Friday, July 26, 2013, on the eve of the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang, North Korea.

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Wong Maye-E/ AP Photo |

North Korean children perform at the May Day stadium during the "Arirang" mass games song-and-dance ensemble on the eve of the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang, North Korea Friday, July 26, 2013.

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David Guttenfelder/ AP Photo |

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves as he arrives for a performance of the "Arirang" mass games at May Day Stadium on the eve of the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang, North Korea Friday, July 26, 2013.

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Ahn Young-joon/ AP Photo |

South Korean women salute to their national flag during a joint memorial service for the war dead to commemorate the upcoming 60th anniversary of the signing of the armistice agreement that ended the Korean War on July 27, 1953, in Hwacheon, near the demilitarized zone that separates two Koreas, South Korea, Saturday, July 13, 2013. During the war, US and 20 other countries fought alongside South Korea under the U.N. flag against North Korean and Chinese troops.

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David Guttenfelder/ AP Photo |

A North Korean soldier helps wipe the tears of an elderly woman as they tour a cemetery for Korean War veterans on Thursday, July 25, 2013, in Pyongyang, North Korea during an opening ceremony marking the 60th anniversary of the signing of the armistice that ended hostilities on the Korean peninsula.

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David Guttenfelder/ AP Photo |

North Korean brother and sister Pak Yun Yong, front right, and Pak Chun Son, wiping her eyes with handkerchief at center, visit the grave of their Korean War veteran father Pak Hyon Jong who died in 1953 when the son was eight and the daughter was five years old. North Korea opened a cemetery for Korean War veterans on Thursday, July 25, 2013, in Pyongyang, North Korea marking the 60th anniversary of the signing of the armistice that ended hostilities on the Korean peninsula.

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Matt Dunham/ AP Photo |

British military veterans who served in the Korean War, flanked by two young serving guardsmen wearing red tunics, take part in a parade en route to a service of thanksgiving at Westminster Abbey in London, to commemorate the 60 year anniversary of the Korean War armistice, Thursday, July 11, 2013.

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Matt Dunham/ AP Photo |

British military veterans in wheelchairs who served in the Korean War are pushed by young serving soldiers as they take part in a parade en route to a service of thanksgiving at Westminster Abbey in London, to commemorate the 60 year anniversary of the Korean War armistice Thursday, July 11, 2013.

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AP file photo |

In this July 1953 black-and-white photo, Gen. Mark Clark, United Nations supreme commander in the Far East, affixes his signature to armistice documents at his base camp in Munsan, Korea. Sixty years after it finished fighting in Korea, the U.S. is still struggling with two legacies that are reminders of the costs -- political, military and human -- that war can impose on the generations that follow.

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AP file photo |

In this July 30, 1953, black-and-white file photo, Commander-in-chief, United Nations Command, and U.S. Army Gen. Mark Clark signs the Military Armistice agreement at a base camp at Munsan-ni, Korea. Sixty years after it finished fighting in Korea, the U.S. is still struggling with two legacies that are reminders of the costs -- political, military and human -- that war can impose on the generations that follow.

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AP file photo |

This July 29, 1953, black-and-white file photo shows happy fliers of the 18th Fighter Bomber wing let the world know how they feels as the come back from one of the combat missions over North Korea to learn of the armistice signing. From left are: 2nd Lt. John Putty, Dallas, Tex.; 1st Lt. James A. Boucek, Ottawa, Kan.: and 1st Lt. Richard D. Westcott, Houston, Tex., waving from back seat of jeep.

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