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Government shutdown ends

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Evan Vucci/AP Photo |

Capitol Visitor Center tour guide Mary Ellen Anderson, of Alexandria, Va., calls over a group of visitors for the start of a tour on Capitol Hill on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 in Washington. After a 16 day shutdown the Capitol Visitors Center reopened, barriers went down at National Park Service sites, and thousands of furloughed federal workers began returning to work throughout the country.

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Evan Vucci/AP Photo |

Richard Doerner, Museum Specialist for the U.S. Senate Commission on Art, listens to the Ohio Clock as he restarts it outside the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 in Washington. The clock stopped during the 16 day government shutdown because the workers that care for the clock were furloughed.

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Stephan Savoia/AP Photo |

Kaity Briscoe laughs with U.S. Park Service Ranger V. Cutright as she and husband Jordan Rousseau, center, wait for the USS Constitution, the oldest ship in the United States Navy, to open in Boston, Thursday morning, Oct. 17, 2013. Federal memorials and National Park Service sites opened, and thousands of furloughed federal workers returned to work across the country Thursday after 16 days off the job due to the partial government shutdown.

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo |

Vice President Joe Biden, left, greets Environmental Protection Agency workers with muffins as they return to work after 16 days of a government shutdown at the William Jefferson Clinton Federal Building in Washington on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013. After 16 days of being off the job, thousands of furloughed federal workers are returning to work now that the government shutdown has been resolved.

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Susan Walsh/AP Photo |

National Park Service employees remove barricades from the grounds of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013. Barriers went down at National Park Service sites and thousands of furloughed federal workers began returning to work throughout the country Thursday after 16 days off the job because of the partial government shutdown.

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Charles Dharapak/AP Photo |

White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough, center, greets federal employees at the entrance to the Eisenhower Executive Office Building as he they return to the White House in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013. Lawmakers Wednesday voted to avoid a financial default and reopen the government after a 16-day partial shutdown.

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Chris Bickford/The New York Times |

Park Police officers, employed by the National Park Service, back on the job at the Lincoln Memorial early in the morning, in Washington, Oct. 17, 2013. President Barack Obama and Congress ended a 16-day shutdown Thursday, clearing the way for federal agencies to again deliver services, reopen public facilities and welcome hundreds of thousands of furloughed employees returning to work.

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Doug Mills/The New York Times |

Park Ranger Richard Trott, employed by the National Park Service, removes a "closed" sign at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Oct. 17, 2013. President Barack Obama and Congress ended a 16-day shutdown Thursday, clearing the way for federal agencies to again deliver services, reopen public facilities and welcome hundreds of thousands of furloughed employees returning to work.

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Stephen Crowley/The New York Times |

White House staff, many back to work after being furloughed, wait for President Barack Obama to speak after the U.S. government opened, at a news conference in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Oct. 17, 2013. President Barack Obama and Congress ended a 16-day shutdown Thursday, clearing the way for federal agencies to again deliver services, reopen public facilities and welcome hundreds of thousands of furloughed employees returning to work.